Health Risks

Hypertriglyceridaemia

Hypertriglyceridaemia refers to having high fasting triglyceride levels, and certain genetic variations play a role in triglyceride metabolism (how the body process and converts fat to energy), which can lead to slower triglyceride metabolism.

DEMO Result

Based on your genetics, your personal predicted risk is

10.74


Your risk for Hypertriglyceridaemia also depends on other factors, including lifestyle and genetic variants not covered by this test.

The population risk for Hypertriglyceridaemia is 19.7

How To Use This Test


This test SHOULD NOT be used to diagnose Hypertriglyceridaemia or any other health conditions.


Please talk to a healthcare professional if you have a family history, if you think you might have this condition or if you have any concerns about your results.

Intended Uses

This predicted personal genetic risk merely considers the genetic/genotype effect towards the disease in an individual without taking into account the environmental factors such as lifestyles, diet and their environment

This result is based on the SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) that are associated with Hypertriglyceridaemia.

Read more


Limitations

The results of this test do not diagnose Hypertriglyceridaemia or related conditions. This should not be used as a diagnostic tool.

This result does not include all possible variants or genes associated with Hypertriglyceridaemia.

This result is limited to existing scientific research.

Lifestyle & Other Risk Factors Can Influence The Risk of Developing Hypertriglyceridaemia

Genetics are NOT the only risk factor for Hypertriglyceridaemia.

Hypertriglyceridaemia is believed to be caused by a combination of environmental, genetic and lifestyle factors. Now that you have learnt about your genetic risk, you can determine how aggressively you need to make lifestyle changes to reduce your risk.

The earlier in your life that you commit to living a healthy lifestyle, the more you can reduce your risk for or delay the development of Hypertriglyceridaemia.

Diabetes
Diabetes

Having high blood sugar and diabetes increases the risk of developing high triglyceride levels.

Blood pressure
Blood Pressure

Having high blood pressure increases the risk of developing high triglyceride levels.

Weight
Weight

Being overweight or obese increases the risk of developing high triglyceride levels.

Smoking
Smoking

Smoking tobacco increases the risk of developing high triglyceride levels.

Exercise
Lack of Exercise

Having a lack of exercise or leading a sedentary lifestyle increases the risk of developing high triglyceride levels.

Suggested Lifestyle Changes

Exercise Recommendations

1

Start with 20-30 minutes of aerobic activity -- anything that gets your heart rate up. Do that for 5 days a week, and your overall cholesterol levels may drop while your good cholesterol will rise.

2

Examples of aerobic activities are basketball, cycling, jumping rope, kickboxing, football.

Dietary Recommendations

1

Aim to avoid or limit your alcohol intake, as alcohol consumption is one of the risk factors of high triglyceride levels.

2

Avoid food with simple carbohydrates like fructose, as these increase triglyceride levels.

3

Having a low fat diet (fat content is <30% of total daily caloric intake) could help in reducing triglyceride levels.

4

If your triglyceride levels is more than 1000 mg/dL, a very low fat diet (<15% of daily caloric intake from fat) is strongly recommended.

What Is Hypertriglyceridaemia
and How Can It Affect You

What is Hypertriglyceridaemia

Triglycerides are a type of fat found in the blood. When you eat, your body converts any calories it doesn't need to use right away into triglycerides. They are stored in your fat cells. Later, hormones release triglycerides for energy in between meals.

However having high triglyceridemia levels (hypertriglyceridemia) means you have too much of this type of fat in your blood, which is not good. Too much fat in the blood can contribute to thickening of the blood vessels of the heart (arteries), which increases the chances of developing stroke, heart attack and heart disease and in extreme cases can cause inflammation to the pancreas.

Mild and moderate hypertriglyceridemia have the triglycerides measurement of 150–999 mg/dL. Severe and very severe hypertriglyceridemia triglycerides have the measurement of > 1000 mg/dL.

Certain genetic variations play a role in triglyceride metabolism (how the body process and converts fat to energy), which can lead to slower triglyceride metabolism. Secondary causes are due to lifestyle and environmental factors, such as, high fat diet, obesity, diabetes, hypothyroidism, and certain medications.

How Does High Triglyceride Levels Affect The Body?

In both men and women, increasing levels of non-fasting triglyceride significantly increases the risk of heart related complications. For example: heart attack, heart disease, thickening of the walls in the arteries and inflammation of the pancreas.

Symptoms Of Hypertriglyceridemia

Most people with elevated triglycerides experience no symptoms. Some forms of primary hypertriglyceridemia can lead to specific symptoms: skin symptoms (eruptive xanthoma), eye abnormalities, enlargement of the liver and spleen, and neurological symptoms. Some experience attacks of abdominal pain that may be mild episodes of pancreatitis.

If you have a family history of this condition or think you have the symptoms, consult with a healthcare professional.

Understanding Your Results

How Is Your Genetic Risk Calculated?

Your genetic risk assessment is

10.74

Genes tested

This result is calculated based on the following SNPs (single nucleotide polymorphism) that are associated with Hypertriglyceridaemia.

GenesYour GenotypeWhat It Means
GCKR_exon15CCTypical
APOA5_promoterTTTypical
ZPR1CCTypical
APOA5_exon2CCTypical
GALNT2GGIncreased risk of severe hypertriglyceridemia
TBL2CCIncreased risk of severe hypertriglyceridemia
ANGPTL3CCIncreased risk of severe hypertriglyceridemia
GCKR_intron16CCTypical
LPL_exon9CCTypical
LPL_3'downstreamGGTypical
LPL_intergenicAAIncreased risk of hypertriglyceridemia
TRIB1ATIncreased risk of hypertriglyceridemia
DOCK7_intron7GTIncreased risk of hypertriglyceridemia
AFF1GTIncreased risk of hypertriglyceridemia
CYP26A1AATypical
SUGP1TTIncreased risk of hypertriglyceridemia
APOB_exon30----
DOCK7_intron5bAATypical
CILP2_PBX4_intergenicCCTypical
FADSTTTypical
XKR6GGReduced risk of hypertriglyceridemia
PCIF1TTTypical

Limitations

This report does not diagnose any health conditions or provide medical advice. This should not be used as a diagnostic tool.

This result is limited to existing scientific research.

Consult with a healthcare professional before making any major lifestyle changes or if you have any other concerns about your results.