Nutrigenomics Vitamin C Requirement

Based on your genetics, your genetic predisposition for Vitamin C Requirement is

Normal
Low
Normal
High

What does this mean?

Likely to have no increased risk of vitamin C deficiency Your genotype indicates that you have no increased risk for vitamin C deficiency. Ensure you meet the recommended daily intake of vitamin C.

How Is Your Genetic Risk Calculated?

This result is based on the SNPs(single nucleotide polymorphism)that are associated with Vitamin C Requirement.

Genes
Your Genotype
What it means?
Genes: SLC23A1
Your Genotype: GG
What it means? Higher plasma vitamin C levels
!

Limitations

This report does not diagnose any health conditions or provide medical advice. This should not be used as a diagnostic tool.
This result is limited to existing scientific research.
Please consult with a healthcare professional before making any major lifestyle changes or if you have any other concerns about your results.

What is Vitamin C Requirement?

Boost your vitamin C intake by eating more fruits such as oranges, grapefruits, cantaloupes, kiwi, mango, papaya, pineapple, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, cranberries and watermelon.

Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, green and red peppers, spinach, cabbage, turnip greens, sweet or white potatoes, and tomatoes are also good sources of vitamin C.

The best food sources of vitamin C are uncooked or raw fruits and vegetables, as it is destroyed by cooking and heat. Lightly steaming your vegetables will lessen nutrient loss.

RDA for men and women is 90mg and 75mg respectively. If you are a smoker, or under heavy physical stress, eg. marathon runner or skier, you are at higher risk for vitamin C deficiency.

Do you have vitamin C deficiency?

Factors affecting vitamin C deficiency

You may be at risk of vitamin C deficiency if you are:

1
2
3

Food Sources Containing Vitamin C

Suggested Lifestyle Changes

Dietary Recommendations:

  1. Based on your genetic profile, you should be able to maintain healthy vitamin C levels through your diet.
  2. Vitamin C rich foods include fruits such as oranges, grapefruits, cantaloupes, kiwi, mango, papaya, pineapple, strawberries, raspberries, blueberries, cranberries and watermelon.
  3. Broccoli, brussels sprouts, cauliflower, green and red peppers, spinach, cabbage, turnip greens, sweet or white potatoes, and tomatoes are also good sources of vitamin C.
  4. The best food sources of vitamin C are uncooked or raw fruits and vegetables, as it is destroyed by cooking and heat. Lightly steaming your vegetables will lessen nutrient loss.
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If you think you have the symptoms, consult with a healthcare professional.